I had to tow my car to the workshop twice within six months! Once due to battery issues (Hey, ain’t that battery only 1.5 years old?) and now, for a dead starter motor.

I could have sworn that at that moment, I really felt like towing my car straight to the scrap yard. Especially when I’m contemplating to get a new car as I don’t feel particularly perky trying to replace all these wear and tear.

And nope, this time round, I don’t feel like doing it at Autobacs – freaking expensive.

Hence, I made my way to a private workshop a friend of mine recommended.

*****

The tow truck slowly completed it’s six storey ascend to the workshop, located on the rooftop of the industrial building. It’s a small workshop with enough space for two vehicles inside the workshop. Yet, it was a comfortable sight. I was greeted with comfortable sight of a Suzuki Swift Sport and a Kia Picanto who were there for servicing.

This workshop is so high up that I can see the roof top of the adjacent building!

This was a marked difference from a previous car workshop I went to at the advise of another friend, a busy workshop filled with Audis and Volvos. A workshop that will make a Suzuki Swift manual transmission driver feel out of place.

After settling all the administrative procedure, I stepped into the lounge, where there’s one other customer around. Not what I would usually do but decided to strike a conversation with him:

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“Are you the owner of the Swift Sports?” I asked.

“Yeah.” He replied, looking curious.

“I’m here to fix my car today. That manual transmission Swift over there.”

And Bingo! I was right! MANUAL is the keyword that got our conversation going.

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It’s tough to find a manual transmission car owner these days.

My friends would always laugh at my choice of my ride. Not uncommon. After all, in this day and age, manual cars belong in the museum.

But I say real man drives a manual.

You can’t spell manual without man.

And it’s a manual transmission owner that knows the joy of driving.

*****

We chatted for a good 90 minutes. From our conversation, I found out that:

  • Both of us were second-hand manual transmission Swift owners.
  • We bought our rides directly from the previous owners.
  • The previous owners recommended us to go to some atas workshops where you see Volvos and Audis which made us felt out of place.

My theory was that drivers who could afford a manual transmission Swift were largely well-to-do folks (aka “High SES” in our lingo). They sold their cars after three years, able to afford their next new car that has an even better performance and comfort. Hence, when we first time owners went back to ask the previous owners advice on where we could go for car maintenance, we got ourselves into those workshops that do business for the high-end cars.

Of course, that is just some random theory that not important.

What’s useful though was that I made a new friend who also enjoyed driving a manual car, lots more so than me! He gave me two additional contacts for workshops that specialises in Suzukis (one of those specialising particularly in Suzuki Swift) that I believe I will find useful should I choose to patch my Swift.

Oh yes, and knowing that the owner of this workshop is a Swift owner himself! He told me that the Swift can last another good 100k over of mileage once the major wear-and-tear issues were resolved. Gives me hope that I need not get a new car after all.

Perhaps the starter came dead for a reason. Looks like I could really consider saving my Swift after all!